LSCR Director's Blog
Calmail’s migration to Mailman, and departmental domain hosting

December 4, 2007

Calmail’s migration to Mailman, and departmental domain hosting

Filed under: announcement,tech — tholub @ 2:26 pm

Today Calmail announced that the mailing list software running on lists.berkeley.edu has been migrated from Majordomo to Mailman. Majordomo had been in place for at least 15 years, but the software was severely obsolete. Mailman is the most commonly used mailing list management package, and mailing list owners will be happy to learn that your list management can now be done entirely through a pretty good web interface, instead of having to send cryptic email messages with Majordomo commands.

If you have public mailing lists, you’ll have to update the instructions you publish about how to sign up for the list. You’ll also want to familiarize yourself with the new interface for approving subscriptions and moderating postings, if you use those features. You will find it a lot easier in the new system once you get used to it.

The team has been working on this migration for over two years; the fact that it is now here will enable a number of other projects to move forward. Most importantly, Calmail is now very close to being able to realistically replace the functions of most departmental mail servers. CalMail is much better positioned to be able to deal with anti-spam and anti-virus protection schemes, and there is no way we can compare with the 24×7 support the service is offered. There are a few more technical details to work out, but we expect that we’ll move most of the email domains that we currently run on L&S hardware or departmental hardware over to CalMail’s departmental domain service over the next year or so. I encourage any of you who are still running your own mail servers to consider whether CalMail can meet your needs.

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